Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Double standards in parliamentary discipline?

Coalition MP receives a minimal fine while opposition MP is allegedly stringently punished.

Stanislav Kubánek (Smer)(Source: TASR)

The parliamentary committee for incompatibility of functions did not impose the fine of €108,000 on Kubánek, as originally proposed by committee members. Coalition MPs supported him, and MP Jozef Burian (also from the ruling Smer party) proposed on April 4 to launch a new proceeding against him, in which Kubánek would get two fines: one for not suspending his self-emplyoment license, and another one for being a legal representative of a trade company. Originally, a total of nine proceedings were held, the SITA newswire wrote. It added that Burian proposes a fine amounting to six month's salary, i.e. a total of about €24,000. The committee will deal with this proposal at its next session.

Double standard

The opposition OĽaNO party, of which Igor Matovič is the chairman, is of the opinion that the ruling coalition has double standards for its own, and for opposition MPs. The April 4 session of the incompatibility of functions committee created an unprecedented situation where the coalition showed that the MPs are not equal, OĽaNO MP Jozef Lukáč told SITA.

“The Coalition uses two unequal meters for the situation,” Lukáč said, pointing out that Stanislav Kubánek has been violating the law by not suspending his license for 3,285 days, thus facing a fine of €108,000.

On the other hand, Matovič had his self-employment license actively running parallel with his parliamentary mandate for a mere 21 days, and the result is a loss of his mandate, and a fine of €12,000.

OĽaNO MP Jozef Viskupič added that the strict hand of the law should apply equally to Kubánek as to other MPs. „Government MPs are only looking for a way to reduce or cancel his fine... While he has been violating the law for nine years,“ Viskupič told SITA, adding that Matovič's mistake was a formality but Kubánek was, in all likelihood, really doing business.

Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Being young is harder than it used to be

The failure of older generations to sympathise with youth means politics are primarily a contest of who can hand out more gifts to old people.

Young Slovaks have problems finding proper jobs.

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.