SNS has still not recovered from 'Captain' Danko

The Slovak National Party sticks with 10 percent of the vote; it was even overtaken by extremists.

The coalition parties leaders (l-r): Andrej Danko, Robert Fico and Béla BugárThe coalition parties leaders (l-r): Andrej Danko, Robert Fico and Béla Bugár (Source: SITA)

Following the controversial promotion of the Slovak National Party (SNS) chair, Andrej Danko, to the military rank of captain, the party’s popularity still remains at about 10 percent.

Meanwhile, the Smer party’s position improved by 1 percentage point, to 26.6 percent. These figures arise from a poll carried out by the Focus agency between April 4 and 9 on 1,006 respondents.

Second place would go to the opposition Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) which would receive 13.7 percent, followed by the far-right People’s Party – Our Slovakia (ĽSNS) of Marian Kotleba with 10.1 percent, the Sme daily reported.

SNS would come fourth with 9.9 percent. In December, before Danko's promotion, the party received 13.7 percent, Sme wrote.

The Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO-NOVA) would make it to parliament, receiving 9.2 percent, followed by We Are Family of Boris Kollár with 8.1 percent, Most-Híd with 6.9 percent, and the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) with 5.4 percent.

Read also:Danko’s popularity keeps falling Read more 

The results indicate that the current ruling coalition of Smer, SNS and Most-Híd would fail to form a government. They would have only 73 mandates in the 150-seat parliament, Sme reported.

According to the poll, 69.6 percent of respondents would have gone to the polling stations. Around 19.5 percent of respondents would not have voted, while 10.9 percent would not have known whom to vote for, the TASR newswire reported.

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