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Leader of the Piťo gang confesses to murder

He also called on his accomplices to collaborate with the police.

Juraj Ondrejčák, aka Piťo(Source: SME)

Head of the Bratislava-based organised crime group Piťovci, Juraj Ondrejčák, aka Piťo, confessed that he had ordered the murder of Ján Tkáč, who at the time led the rival group Takáčovci.

Moreover, Piťo promised, during a hearing held in late March, that he would collaborate with the police and called on his “comrades” to do the same, the Pravda daily reported, referring to a source close to the police.

“He sent them a message to try to improve their position and mitigate their sentences,” the source told Pravda.

Read also: Read also:Prosecutor drops charges against Piťovci Gang

Takáč died on July 30, 2003 in Bratislava’s Kramáre district. After he entered his Mercedes car, a member of the Piťovci group, Ľuboš Zelman, started shooting at the car with a submachine gun.

The investigator charged three people with the murder in March: Ondrejčák, Matej Šalaga and Marek Orlík. The fact that the charges against Zelman have been postponed indicates that he is the one to provide police with information, Pravda reported.

Ondrejčák is currently serving his 16-year sentence for founding the organised crime group, while Zelman faces charges of double murder in the Bratislava-based Irish Pub in 1999.

The police managed to dissolve the Piťovci group after four police actions, of which the first took place in 2011 and the last in September 2016, Pravda wrote.

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