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Two Bratislavan men caught trading illegally via the dark web

Slovak police succeed in uncovering the first case of gun and drug dealing via the dark web.

(Source: Ján Krolšák, SME)

Two Bratislavan men were caught illegally dealing guns and drugs abroad. They traded via the anonymous, highly protected and hard to access part of the internet called the dark web, full of illegal activities.

The police in cooperation with German Europol, accused 33-year-old Adam and 28-year-old Lukáš of dealing drugs and guns in March. The men are currently in prison and could face sentences of 10 to 15 years for drug dealing and 3 to 8 years for dealing in arms.

During a domiciliary search in September 2016, the police found dozens of cannabis plants equal to 15,000 doses, LSD amounting to 117 doses, 5 guns and 600 rounds of ammunition. The police also logged onto the server which the criminals used to trade on the Internet and found 203,000 euros in bitcoins used for anonymous payments and also identified other buyers and sellers of drugs, guns and explosives.

“Criminals like to use these open websites for illegal activities,” said Jari Liukku from Europol, as quoted by the TASR newswire. Illegal online shopping is spreading according to him.

Read also: Read also:Extremist Magát guilty of illegal gun possession

That’s why he wants the cooperation between EU countries to become better. They want to focus on migrants, smuggling, human trafficking, document forgery and money laundering on the Internet.

“We realize that crimes are moving into the Internet environment,” said police chief Tibor Gašpar, as quoted by TASR. He wants to enlarge the department for the investigation of Internet crime to 30 policemen.

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