Police reveal tax fraud worth millions of euros

Police accused eight people who may spend between seven to twelve years in prison.

Tibor GašparTibor Gašpar (Source: Peter Maďar, SITA)

The National Criminal Agency (NAKA) has revealed two tax frauds connected with poultry and rapeseed oil trading. Police accused eight people altogether.

In the first case, called Max, the damage to the state budget was at least €1,069,097. A group of people committed tax fraud between June 2015 and January 2016, creating different companies when using “invoicing chains”.

Police checked six houses in Nitra, Šaľa, Chtelnica, Horná Streda and Bratislava. Papers, computer technology and memory cards were investigated. Seven people were arrested.

“The prison term for this kind of fraud is from seven to twelve years,” said Police President Tibor Gašpar, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

The second case, called Trade, was concerned with the trading of frozen chicken meat. The accused would order the products from the Czech Republic and supply them to a company in Slovakia but did not pay taxes during this process.

Read also:Why big fish are not in jail Read more 

In this case the damage caused amounted to €5.4 million. Police carried out operations in Trenčín, Nové Mesto nad Váhom, Sládkovičovo, Bratislava, Dubnica nad Váhom and Nitra. Two people were accused.

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