Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Kiska vetoes bill which would weaken him

The amendment transfers powers to appoint and remove the ÚRSO chair, from the president to the government.

Andrej Kiska(Source: Marek Mrvis, SITA)

On May 25, President Andrej Kiska vetoed and returned to parliament for repeat proceedings, an amendment to the Office for the Regulation of Network Industries (ÚRSO) Act, stating that the bill curbs the energy regulatory authority's independence.

Kiska objected to the fact that the amendment transfers powers to appoint and remove the ÚRSO chair from the president to the government, thereby making the body subject to political pressure, the TASR newswire reported.

Read also: Read also:New law would reform utility regulator

In addition, Kiska also criticised changes regarding the Economy Ministry's and Environment Ministry's involvement in the ÚRSO 's pricemaking proceedings.

“These changes ... would significantly affect the office’s independence and decision-making processes on energy prices, a situation that is at direct variance with the harmonisation rules of the European Union directives,” stated Kiska, as quoted by TASR.

Describing the amendment as a wasted opportunity, Kiska said that the real problems with the ÚRSO are in fact related to a “wrongly formulated strategy, contradictory goals, conflicts of interest, nontransparent rules and poor supervision of regulated entities”.

Top stories

A Slovak prisoner tattooed in Auschwitz, remained silent until he grew very old

Lale Sokolov fell in love in the concentration camp; only those close to him knew his story.

A tattoo, illustrative stock photo

Kiska: Only president can bestow awards

President Andrej Kiska turned to Constitutional Court over the law on state awards recently passed by the government.

President Andrej Kiska granting awards, January 1, 2018

Global warming is a myth, claims a hoax

According to recent hoaxes published online, snow in the Sahara disproves global warming and milk can block airways.

The snowfall in Sahara can be seen in this satellite picture.

Blog: Are flying cars coming to the skies?

At least 19 companies, including a Slovak one, are currently developing flying car planes, but there are still many issues that must be worked out.

AeroMobil