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Presidential Palace opens to the public on June 15

On the 3rd anniversary of the inauguration, President Andrej Kiska opens the doors of his residence, the historical Grassalkovich Palace.

Presidential Palace in Bratislava.(Source: Sme)

From 9:00 until 17:30 (the last entry at 17:00), the Presidential Palace in the Hodžovo Square is hosting an Open Day, the Plus Jeden Deň daily wrote.

The programme includes guided tours, student concerts and presentations explaining the work that takes place in the palace. Visitors can also see the guards of honour and listen to the military orchestra.

At 13:00, Kiska will welcome children from across Slovakia who have participated in the nation-wide competition Rights through the Eyes of Children, the SITA newswire wrote.

“Visitors can enter the palace directly, through the gate in Hodžovo Square, and the presidential garden will remain open, as it is always,” the Presidential Office told the daily.

New this year are the guided tours, the Bratislava conservatory concert, and the brief presentations on work in the palace.

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Topic: Bratislava


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