Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Parliament Speaker says he feels nostalgic about totalitarian regime

Andrej Danko, the head of SNS, is known for numerous slips of the tongue.

Andrej Danko(Source: Jozef Jakubco, SME)

Parliamentary Speaker Andrej Danko (SNS) departed on Sunday for a working visit to South Korea for the second meeting of the Presidents of the Parliaments of Eurasian countries. He will remain there until Thursday, his spokeswoman Eva Kliská informed TASR.

The idea of ​​these meetings was initiated jointly by the National Assembly of the Republic of Korea and the State Duma of the Russian Federation. The first meeting was held in April 2016 in Moscow. Danko has expressed hopes that the third meeting would be held in Prague or Bratislava.

Danko has had several bilateral meetings during the conference. On Monday, he met with President of the lower house of the Russian parliament - the State Duma - Vyacheslav Volodin;

“We are historically predestined for cooperation. We are tied by materials. Whoever said that Slovakia shouldn’t deepen its relationship with Russia is wrong,” Danko said after the meeting, as quoted by the Sme Daily.

He also met with deputies of the Kia Motors Corporation that has a plant near Žilina. The South-Koreans are anxious for Slovakia to finish the highway between Žilina and Ostrava, according to Danko. They would then gain a connection between Kia in Slovakia and Hyundai in the Czech Republic.

Read also: Read also:Danko’s office opens MPs’ letters

On Wednesday during a visit to the demilitarised zone that separates North and South Korea, he expressed his nostalgia for the days when Slovakia, as part of Czechoslovakia, was ruled by a totalitarian regime.

"Seeing this zone, was for me, an indescribable experience, and I admit that it provoked in me a great sense of nostalgia for the barbed wire that isolated our country," he wrote on social media.

The barbed wire which Danko misses so much was a part of the Iron Curtain. In Czechoslovakia, it stretched along the borders with the former Federal Republic of Germany and Austria. Danko, who is well known for his slips of the tongue, was fifteen when the Iron Curtain fell in 1989.

The press office of the SNS party has not so far commented on Danko’s post.

Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Being young is harder than it used to be

The failure of older generations to sympathise with youth means politics are primarily a contest of who can hand out more gifts to old people.

Young Slovaks have problems finding proper jobs.

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.