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More than half of Slovaks earn less than €900

Bratislava is the richest region – but even there, around 40 percent earn less than the average salary.

(Source: Sme)

Despite the positive developments in the labour market, many Slovaks are still dissatisfied with their salaries, the Hospodárske noviny daily wrote on July 4. While about two-fifths of Bratislavans earn less than the average wage, in Prešov Region, that number is over 70 percent.

This comes from the recently published analysis of Poštová Banka, which suggests that up to 55 percent of Slovaks working full-time earned less than €900 gross last year, of whom 7 percent see less than €450 on their payslip.

“Around one-fifth of people in full-time jobs were in the range of €900-1,200 per month, while 10 percent earned between €1,200-1,500 gross,” banking analyst Jana Glasová said, as quoted by the TASR newswire. “Only 14 percent of people working full time could boast of salaries exceeding €1,500. Meanwhile, only 6 percent earned a salary of more than €2,000 gross per month.”

The most common salary category in the country was the range of €450-900 per month. While fewer than 40 percent of people earned such salaries in Bratislava and the surrounding area, the figures exceeded 60 percent in other regions.

As few as 5 percent of people earned less than €450 per month in Bratislava Region, but as many as 14 percent in Prešov Region did so.

Conversely, 14 percent received more than €2,000 in Bratislava Region, while this was true for less than 2 percent in Prešov Region.

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Topic: Economics


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