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Smer is the wealthiest political party

The party will also receive the highest contribution for its election results.

Leaders of the three coalition parties: Robert Fico, Andrej Danko, Béla Bugár (l-r).(Source: SITA)

The richest political party in Slovakia is the ruling party Smer, whose assets amounted to €13.9 million at the end of 2016.

The second wealthiest is opposition Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) with €5.1 million, followed by Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO) with €3.1 million, the TASR newswire reported.

According to its financial statements, the fourth richest party in Slovakia at the end of 2016 was the far-right People’s Party – Our Slovakia (ĽSNS) with €2.2 million, followed by Most-Híd with €1.2 million, We Are Family of Boris Kollár with €1.2 million, and the Slovak National Party (SNS) with €831,683.

Of the non-parliamentary parties, the Party of Hungarian Community owned assets amounting to €548,092 in the end of 2016, while the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) reported its assets at €137,969.

Many parties also received various gifts or financial contributions from natural persons last year. KDH earned the most from this, taking in €358,916. Most-Híd received more than €300,000 in gifts, while SMK received €74,386, SaS €41,185, ĽSNS €37,441, and We Are Family €4,549, TASR reported.

The Smer, SNS and OĽaNO parties claimed they earned no money from gifts last year.

Political parties also received millions of euros from state in the form of a contribution for votes, a contribution for activities, and a contribution for mandates.

They received part of the money immediately after the 2016 general election, while the rest will be distributed throughout the election term. If the current government rules for the entire four years, Smer will receive a total €16.7 million, SaS €7.5 million, OĽaNO €6.8 million SNS €5.4 million, ĽSNS €5.04 million, We Are Family €4.1 million, and Most-Híd €4.04 million, TASR wrote.

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