Falcons found home in Slovakia

Record number of nesting red-footed falcons in last seven years.

(Source: www.dravce.sk)

Ornithologists confirmed 17 nesting couples of red-footed falcons in Slovakia. It is a big success for species critically endangered in Slovakia. The precious locality is in the west of the country, however, the specific place is secret because ornithologists want to keep the place safe and undisturbed.

“Red-footed falcons disappeared because of using chemicals and significant changes in agriculture,” said Roman Slobodník from Raptor Protection of Slovakia. In 2012, following the example of Hungarian neighbours, a project focused on returning raptors back to Slovakia started.

In the localities known as nesting places in the past were installed 300 boxes and 30 pads because red-footed falcons do not build their own nests but only use nests of other birds or boxes. Ornithologists also planted and grew trees and succeeded in protecting rooks, magpies and crows. When checking the boxes and pads, ornithologists found 17 nesting couples.

“Our work doesn’t end here, quite the opposite – we want to do everything to ease the falcons’ search for food,” continued Slobodník, explaining that there is not enough food in nesting localities and falcons have to fly long distances to find it. Ornithologists plan to feed them so that parents do not have to fly out of the nest as often.

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