Police rejected criminal complaints against Holjenčík

Two criminal complaints against the former head of the energy regulatory office have been turned down after a pre-preparatory procedure.

Jozef Holjenčík, chair of the Regulatory Office for Network Industries Jozef Holjenčík, chair of the Regulatory Office for Network Industries (Source: Sme)

The complaints against Jozef Holjenčík, the former head of the regulatory Office for Network Industries, were rejected by police, the police spokesperson Martin Wäldl told the SITA newswire on July 27. The criminal complaints concerned suspicion of crimes of abuse of power by a public official.

These were rejected following a pre-preparatory procedure, with the explanation that there was no reason to launch criminal prosecution. Wäldl said that in one case the prosecutor has already rejected an appeal against a decision.

In the second case, concerning the prices of energy for 2017, the appeal of those who reported the crime has not yet been decided.

Read also:New law would reform utility regulator Read more 

Holjenčík became the head of ÚRSO in 2007. He announced his resignation to Prime Minister Robert Fico in February 2017, following a scandal surrounding rising energy prices that conflicted with announcements of lower prices.

Both coalition and opposition leaders dealt with the energy price situation, and the chairman of the coalition party SNS Andrej Danko insisted on Holjenčík leaving the position. Chairman of Most-Híd Béla Bugár even suggested that a coalition crisis would ensue if Holjenčík stayed in office.

On July 25, former economy minister and incumbent Smer MP Ľubomír Jahnátek was appointed the new head of ÚRSO.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Theme: Energy


Top stories

Slovak wines do great abroad, but inspectors see them as unfit at home

Slovak legislation does not recognise orange and cloudy wines. As a result, inspectors remove them from the shelves of stores in Slovakia.

Michelin-starred restaurants buy Slovak wines while inspectors in Slovakia remove some of them from the shelves of stores

This is not even the end of the beginning

Somehow Boris Johnson sold himself as the least tiresome.

The UK is like a flatmate who promised to move out, but just never leaves. In the meantime, they keep stealing beer from the refrigerator while complaining about how it tastes.

Economy minister: A gas crisis may come after the New Year

Slovakia will probably have to use all measures possible to secure supplies.

Gas storage facility in Gajary.

Tragedy in Prešov and bad news for Kočner from the U.S.

It’s less than three months before the general election and the chairmen of two major parties are facing criminal prosecution.