Woodcarvers created sculptures in 40 minutes

The proceeds from the fast-carving event were given to charity.

(Source: Romana Buganová, TASR)

Only 40 minutes were set for six artist woodcarvers from Slovakia, Poland and Czech Republic to create wooden sculptures. The unconventional competition in fast-carving took place in Jánska dolina.

Sculptures were designated for auction with proceeds given for treatment of a 4-year-old boy with muscular dystrophy. In the past, money has been given to nursery schools or blind children.

“This event is organized mainly because people need it and want it,” said main organizer Ján Strachan for the TASR newswire.

Fast-carving is a hard discipline, as noted one of the woodcarvers Adam Bakoš. “We have to be careful not to hurt ourselves and because of sharp saws we also must take care not to accidentally cut off a piece of the sculpture,” he said for TASR.

Woodcarvers turn eight cubic metres of wood into sculptures during this event. A different theme for carving is given every year. This year it was a kingdom full of knights.

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