Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Fight against corruption still theory

The prime minister promises a fight against corruption, but the public would rather welcome concrete measures.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: SME)

Several cases from the past few years have proven that the protection of whistleblowers in Slovakia is not very effective. One of the most recent cases concerns former employees of the Foreign Affairs Ministry, who lost their jobs after pointing out dubious practices in the organisation of cultural events linked to the country’s EU Council presidency.

Though the people who decide to blow the whistle on their employers or colleagues should be protected by a law that came into force in 2015, only a few seem to trust the mechanism.

The state now wants to improve the protection of whistleblowers by founding a new office.

“There’s a high chance of a new Protection of Public Interest Office being established, which will, among others, protect people ready to fight corruption by providing relevant information,” said Prime Minister Robert Fico during his visit to the International Anti-Corruption Academy (IACA) in Laxenburg, Austria, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

Pavel Sybila, head of the Let’s Stop Corruption Foundation think tank, welcomes the idea since this agenda is currently being handled by labour inspectorates that have other work to do.

“Whether the office will be successful and will really help people will depend on its head,” Sybila told The Slovak Spectator.

The influence of the new authority, however, may be lowered by the unwillingness of police and prosecutor’s office to deal with politically sensitive issues which also discourages whistleblowers from reporting corruption, adds Gabriel Šípoš, head of ethics watchdog Transparency International Slovensko (TIS).

March’s requirements remain unheard

Fico has been declaring the intention of helping whistleblowers and fight against corruption for months.

Yet, not everybody is satisfied with how corruption is being handled by the responsible authorities. This includes students who have organised three anti-corruption marches. They are calling for the proper investigation of the infamous Gorilla and Bašternák cases, as well as the resignation of Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák, Police Corps President Tibor Gašpar and Special Prosecutor Dušan Kováčik.

How did Fico respond to the invitation to anti-corruption march? What is the cooperation between Slovakia and the International Anti-Corruption Academy about?

The rest of this article is premium content at Spectator.sk
Subscribe now for full access

I already have subscription - Sign in

Subscription provides you with:
  • Immediate access to all locked articles (premium content) on Spectator.sk
  • Special weekly news summary + an audio recording with a weekly news summary to listen to at your convenience (received on a weekly basis directly to your e-mail)
  • PDF version of the latest issue of our newspaper, The Slovak Spectator, emailed directly to you
  • Access to all premium content on Sme.sk and Korzar.sk

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Slovak healthcare needs thousands of medical workers

Slovak doctors, nurses and midwives are not hesitating in finding better work conditions abroad.

Illustrative Stock Photo

Study shows construction of Eastring gas pipeline is feasible

Construction of the interconnector may begin in 2022.

Variants of the possible route of Eastring

Spectacular Slovakia #3: Unexpected hiking (Enjoy Bratislava's greenery) Audio

In Slovakia, you can hike in the capital city. Listen to the latest episode of our travel podcast to find out more.

Foreigners: Top 10 events in Bratislava Video

Tips for the top 10 events in the capital between September 21 and September 30, plus regular services in different languages, training, temporary exhibitions and highlights of the year.

Kapitulská