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Jaguar Land Rover closer to production launch in late 2018

The fourth carmaker in Slovakia has started a massive labour campaign; new workers do not need automotive experiences

Alexander Wortberg, operations director of JLR Slovakia in front of the poester with the model Land Rover Discovery. (Source: TASR)

This piece has been replaced with a story written by the Spectator’s staff.

The carmaker Jaguar Land Rover Slovakia has officially launched a recruitment campaign to find workers for the brand new plant it is building near Nitra for €1.4 billion. But it is not the only company looking for employees. Other carmakers in Slovakia are looking for new workers, along with the online retailer Amazon building its returns centre in Sereď, just about 33 km far from Nitra. The existing carmakers are employing workers from abroad and the fourth car maker is not excluding this type of recruitment either.

The Slovak arm of the British-Indian carmaker is looking for more than 1000 people while it wants to recruit them by March 2018. Around 800 will be operators, who will work in the first shift planned to start at the end of 2018. There are currently around 230 open positions for managers, engineers, technicians, specialists and skilled workers.

“We are looking for people with a positive attitude; that means automotive or manufacturing experiences are not necessary,” said Nicci Cook, HR director at Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) Slovakia, when introducing the recruitment campaign.

The average monthly salary offered to blue collar workers ranges between €900 and €1,800, subject to the position. This is the average monthly income based on a yearly income. It includes a base salary, 13th salary, manufacturing bonus and transport allowance. The carmaker also offers a supplementary pension scheme, life and accident insurance paid by the company as well as bonuses to be provided within a flexible benefit scheme, the so-called cafeteria.

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Topic: Automotive


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