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Jockeying for position: but which position?

Who will benefit from the Fico-Kiska conflict? Neither of the men involved.

President Andrej Kiska and Prime Minister Robert Fico(Source: TASR)

The Kiska-Fico relationship was always going to be a thorny one. That, at least, was what observers of the ever-more unpredictable Slovak political scene told us. But Andrej Kiska’s first years in the presidential office did not fulfill those expectations.

Sure, there have always been differences between Andrej Kiska the President and Robert Fico the Prime Minister. Most notably, they differed in their statements amid the peak of the migration crisis.

But those differences were nothing like the harsh exchanges that the nation witnessed during the 2014 presidential campaign, especially preceding the run-off vote between Kiska and Fico.

Read also:Kiska regrets tax discrepancies, Fico accuses him of influencing police

The past few weeks have proved that the analysts were, in the end, right. What has ensued between the two men over recent weeks could be called open warfare, with very little exaggeration. Not only have Fico (and his right-hand man Robert Kaliňák) practically called Kiska a tax fraudster, but Kiska has not shied away from calling the prime minister a liar.

Slovakia experienced a conflict-driven relationship between top constitutional officials in the infamous times of Vladimír Mečiar: nobody wants to repeat that.

So what is the effect of this whole situation?

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