President challenges the new energy regulation law

He criticises the extension of more powers to the ruling government.

President Andrej KiskaPresident Andrej Kiska(Source: Sme)

President Andrej Kiska has challenged the recent changes to the law on the regulation of energy prices at the Constitutional Court. He wants it to decide whether the amendment, adopted this spring, is in compliance with the constitution and European laws.

Read also:The energy regulator to be more open with the public Read more 

The president objects to the change concerning the election of the chair of the energy regulator, the Regulatory Office for Network Industries (ÚRSO) and the setting of new energy prices, the Sme daily reported.

Under the old rules, the new chair was proposed by the government, while the president could veto the nomination. After the amendment was adopted, he lost this power.

“By amending the law the government has violated the existing distribution of power,” Kiska said, as quoted by Sme. “It also subordinated the regulator’s head to direct political control of the government that rules the country. It has become a political function.”

Following the changes, the government appointed Ľubomír Jahnátek, former MP for Smer and ex-economy and agriculture minister, to lead the ÚRSO in mid-July.

Read also:Jahnátek will become the new head of the regulatory authority, ÚRSO Read more 

The previous chair, Jozef Holjenčík, had to leave at the beginning of the year, after the scandal over high energy prices, Sme wrote.

As for setting energy prices, Kiska objects to the fact that the process is now supervised by the Ministries of the Economy and the Environment.

“The return of the participation of the ministries in pricing proceedings is at odds with the EU rules,” Kiska said, as quoted by Sme. “It increases the risk of interference with the regulator’s decisions.”

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Theme: Energy


Top stories

Slovak wines do great abroad, but inspectors see them as unfit at home

Slovak legislation does not recognise orange and cloudy wines. As a result, inspectors remove them from the shelves of stores in Slovakia.

Michelin-starred restaurants buy Slovak wines while inspectors in Slovakia remove some of them from the shelves of stores

This is not even the end of the beginning

Somehow Boris Johnson sold himself as the least tiresome.

The UK is like a flatmate who promised to move out, but just never leaves. In the meantime, they keep stealing beer from the refrigerator while complaining about how it tastes.

Economy minister: A gas crisis may come after the New Year

Slovakia will probably have to use all measures possible to secure supplies.

Gas storage facility in Gajary.

Tragedy in Prešov and bad news for Kočner from the U.S.

It’s less than three months before the general election and the chairmen of two major parties are facing criminal prosecution.