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Slovaks are mentioned in the Paradise Papers

More information will be published later this week.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: SME)
Read also:Slovak money-laundering company from Panama Papers was founded by Borec

The extensive database of recently leaked financial documents about people and companies investing their property in tax havens also contains documents directly pertaining to Slovaks. Their number is as high as 3,500, Pavla Holcová from the Czech Centre for Investigative Journalism confirmed for the TASR newswire.

“3,500 documents is a great many and it not only concerns individuals but also companies,” Holcová said, as quoted by TASR, adding that they relate to the period from the 1990s to 2016.

The Czech Centre for Investigative Journalism, which collaborates on the analysis of the so-called Paradise Papers, is currently working on the first preliminary analysis of the documents and the people mentioned in them.

Read also:Panama Papers connect PM’s friend with oligarchs

“We will have more information later this week,” Holcová said, as quoted by TASR.

The Paradise Papers were shared on November 5 by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalism. They provide evidence about the undisclosed investments of big multinational companies, as well as well-known politicians and personalities in tax havens. It contains some 13.4 million files that have come from two offshore service providers and the company registries of 19 tax havens.

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