Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

A total of 750 new jobs open in Levice

An expanding company, a producer for the automotive industry, invests €17 million in the Levice-Géňa industrial park while offering 750 jobs.

Apart from expansion in levice, ZF Slovkaia also builds a new plant in Šahy; the foudnation stone was festively presented in September 2017.(Source: TASR)

The company ZF Slovakia wants to expand production in the town of Levice in the south of the country, where it should open 750 new job offers, the Sme daily wrote on November 15. The company is planning expansion in the Levice-Géňa industrial park, where it should produce adaptive dampers for the automotive industry. As the Economy Ministry informed, the firm plans to invest €17 million.

ZF Slovakia has already asked the state for an investment stimuli of €4.25 million, the Pravda daily wrote, adding that the aid is required in the form of income tax relief. The ministry reacted by proposing to approve the investment aid.

Currently, the firm – part of the Austrian ZF Holding, which has been operating in Slovakia since 1993 but under a different name – produces conventional dampers in its Levice plant. Yet it started expanding production in new types of dampers this year. In 2015, ZF Slovakia had 2,530 employees and a net turnover of €382 million.

The investment project could ultimately be finished in five years, and after that, the company will produce nearly 10 million dampers with almost the entire production being exported, Pravda wrote.

Topic: Automotive


Top stories

UN committee: Slovakia still discriminates against Roma

Government should adopt measures to remove discrimination and segregation of the minority.

Moldava nad Bodvou

Slovak cybersecurity firm participated in global operation to disrupt malware system

Eset monitored malware and its impact on users over several years

Sagan shows impressive core exercises Video

The three-time world champion will start the new season in a month's time in Australia.

Peter Sagan

Infertility in men is increasing with those in their 40s better off then those in their 20s

Treatment of infertility can cost tens, or even several thousand euros. Only part of the cost is covered by health insurance companies.

To be fertile, a man has to have 15 million sperms per milligram of ejaculate, of which 4 million must be healthy.