Only 20 percent of Slovaks exclusively buy Christmas presents in traditional shops

Popularity of foreign online shops increasing

(Source: Sme)

An increasing number of Slovaks are buying Christmas presents online while foreign online shops are becoming more popular. This stems from a survey the STEM/MARK polling agency conducted for the Home Credit company. Based on the survey, each third Slovak buys one half of their Christmas presents in brick-and-mortar shops and the second half online. Only one fifth of people buy all presents in traditional shops.

“Both ways, either traditional shops or online shops, have their pros and cos,” said Roman Müller, analyst of Home Credit, a consumer finance company, as cited by the TASR newswire. “When using online shops, you avoid stress from crowded shopping centres, waiting in queues, traffic jams or problems with parking. On the other hand, there is a risk that the goods ordered online will be not as they looked in the picture or there is a danger that they will arrive late. Buyers also need to count with a fee for delivery.”

In general, more younger people and people with higher education are inclined toward online shopping.

Shopping in advance

The survey showed that as much as two thirds of Slovaks buy Christmas presents for their friends and family in advance, i.e. during November and early December. There are even 10 percent who buy Christmas presents throughout the year. Still more than 20 percent leave Christmas shopping to the very last days before Christmas.

Even though most Slovaks buy Christmas presents in shops, about 20 percent give their relatives products they make on their own. Three quarters of these people argue that in this way they present their relatives with original gifts. Others see this as a way to save money.

One third of the respondents approach the selection of Christmas presents pragmatically when they tell each other what they want.

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