Trains will speed up to 160 km per hour between Bratislava and Púchov

Travel time from Bratislava to Žilina will be shortened by 15 minutes to two hours and 31 minutes

(Source: Sme)

Express trains between Bratislava and Púchov will be able to travel at speeds of up to 160 kilometres per hour from December 10 of this year. After the completion of works on the track near Trenčín their journey from the capital to Žilina will be 15 minutes shorter. It will last two hours and 31 minutes and the journey to Trenčín will be seven minutes shorter, taking one hour and 21 minutes. The state-run passenger railway company ZSSK introduced the new train timetable for 2017/2018 on December 4.

“Faster trains are one of the ways to get passengers to use our services by providing them with a meaningful alternative to cars,” said ZSSK CEO Filip Hlubocký, as cited by the SITA newswire.

Read also:Modernisation of railways near Trenčín postponed again Read more 

The state railway operator, Železnice Slovenskej republiky (ŽSR) invested €245million excluding VAT into the modernisation of the 12-km Zlatovce – Trenčianska Teplá track. The company had to cover the costs from its own resources as the European Commission did not provide money for this project due to questionable public procurement. The works lasted five years.

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