Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Foreign workers in Slovakia seek the most economical accommodation

Most prefer accommodation close to their place of work.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: Sme)

Foreigners coming to Slovakia to work for the manufacturing industry try to live as economically as possible. They often do not arrive with their families and only work for a short period of time.

“They live in various rooming houses, in former guest houses and similar properties where as many workers as possible can live for the cheapest,” Ján Palenčár, head of the National Association of Real Estate Agencies in Slovakia (NARKS), told the TASR newswire.

Workers try to find accommodation close to the city where they work. They can also rent accommodation due to laws permitting short-term rentals.

“The law gives preferential treatment to the flat’s owner which means that the flat’s owner does not have to fear that if they terminate the agreement with the tenant, the tenant will stay in the flat by using legal obstructions,” Pálenčár said, as quoted by TASR.

At the same time, the flat’s owners pay taxes to the state, he added.

The municipality, on whose territory the accommodation facility is located, adopts the regulation with which it sets the local tax for accommodation. In Bratislava, for example, the tax amounts to €1.70 a night per person in the facility.

Taxes depend on the number of nights people spend in the facility, TASR wrote.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Topic: Real Estate


Top stories

People marched for LGBTI rights in Bratislava

Take a look at the Bratislava Rainbow Pride 2018 that took place on Saturday, July 14.

First Slovak LGBTI activist has fought for 40 years

Czechoslovakia was one of the first countries to say homosexuality is not a crime, also thanks to the first activists like Imrich Matyáš.

Imrich Matyáš (r) met with German publicist and lawyer Kurt Hiller (second r) in Ľubochňa in 1935.

Measles might spread further west

Police will assist the vaccination in communities from where the epidemic spread.

This is why I support the Pride march

There is still a lot of work ahead of us in the United States, in Slovakia, and around the world to fight for equal rights for everyone no matter who they are or who they love, writer US Ambassador to Slovakia.

Slovakia's first Gay Pride parade crossed Bratislava's New Bridge on May 22.