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Lego exhibition takes place in Modrý Kameň castle

The oldest Lego blocks and the first building sets exhibited.

(Source: Courtesy of Modrý Kameň)
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Almost thirty models and scenes are being shown in the biggest Lego exhibition currently in Slovakia. The exhibition is accessible at the Museum of Puppetry and Toys at Modrý Kameň Castle. The museum prepared it in cooperation with members of the Slovak Lego fan club TatraLUG.

The exhibition includes the oldest Lego blocks and the first building sets exhibited, which are about 60 years old. Visitors will find also car models, some Slovak castles, the Sydney Opera House, Statue of Liberty, the Eiffel Tower, the London Tower, the railway and panorama of Poprad.

“Visitors may learn about Lego history via a short animated movie and for those who want to play with Legos, there is an interactive room,” said Erika Antolová, a curator of the exhibition, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

The exhibition will be open until the end of July 2018.

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Topic: Tourism and travel in Slovakia


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