INTERVIEW WITH ANDREY KALIKH

They are asking if we really want war

Pressure on us not to publish what we found is part of propaganda.

MoscowMoscow(Source: AP/TASR)

Andrey Kalikh links journalists who write about corruption. He believes that if he shows people how corrupt the regime they live in is, he can change things in Russia.

Last Sunday, bikers from the Night Wolves laid wreaths at the World War II memorial at Bratislava’s Slavin. Russian Embassy representatives were also in attendance.

Were they really allowed to enter the country? It is worth looking at who they are. They receive presidential grants, Putin awarded their boss, they are official propagandists. They took part in the campaigns defending the operations in Ukraine, they also have a base in Crimea.

Their annual journey to Berlin, following the route of the Soviet Army, can be interpreted as a sort of soft occupation. They use the Soviet flags and slogans, too. That is also why I believe they should be banned from entering the EU.

They are banned from entering Poland. Should such a ban be issued in other EU countries?

Sanctions that were issued in reaction to the Crimean occupation, which was promoted by the Wolves, are sufficient. It is much like the efforts to ban Russian broadcasting in the West. There is a clash between freedom of expression and protection of citizens from spreading war propaganda. You need to find the right measure. In my view, the employees of this television network are no journalists, they are the soldiers of the information war. What they are aiming for is the occupation of minds.

How does civil society work in Russia under Putin?

You can do whatever you want. As soon as you start criticising the local or the federal government officials or conduct anti-corruption investigations, you are in trouble. They might accuse you of not paying your taxes properly, insulting the government, spreading extremism and hate speech, or whatever. In my opinion, NGOs need to struggle for more independence.

But if they accept funds from abroad, they end up labelled as “foreign agents”, which puts them at a disadvantage.

The rest of this article is premium content at Spectator.sk
Subscribe now for full access

I already have subscription - Sign in

Subscription provides you with:
  • Immediate access to all locked articles (premium content) on Spectator.sk
  • Special weekly news summary + an audio recording with a weekly news summary to listen to at your convenience (received on a weekly basis directly to your e-mail)
  • PDF version of the latest issue of our newspaper, The Slovak Spectator, emailed directly to you
  • Access to all premium content on Sme.sk and Korzar.sk

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

U.S. government takes action against Kočner

The Magnitsky Act now applies to the man charged with the Kuciak murder.

Marian Kočner

A great past but not such a bright present

How come despite its tourism potential and an industrial park nearby, Kežmarok has an unemployment rate three times higher than Slovakia's average?

The town of Kežmarok, Slovakia

More than €1.4 million collected for people from building explosion in Prešov

The building will be gradually dismantled, one person from the 12th floor still missing.

Companies should not exist for profit alone

Martina Kolesárová describes how the business mindset of the 21st century goes beyond profit, perceiving social impact as a goal and also as a potential business opportunity.

Gib Bulloch speaking at 2019 BLF CSR Summit in Bratislava.