Slovak primaeval forest made cover of prestigious magazine

The photo illustrates the influence of climate change on important mushrooms and bacteria that live in symbiosis with tree roots.

(Source: m.smedata.sk/Nature, Ondrej Kameniar)

A photo of the Slovak primaeval forest from Veľká Fatra made the title page of the scientific magazine Nature.

The shot was taken by Ondrej Kameniar, a researcher of European primaeval forests, the Denník N reported.

The fir-beech primaeval forest in National Natural Reservation Kundračka illustrates the influence of climate change on important mushrooms and bacteria that live in symbiosis with tree roots, Tech Sme wrote.

The mushrooms and bacteria offer nutrition to trees, and the trees give off carbon in return. An international team of scientists published maps of these relations. They include about 1.1 million of forests in the whole world, Tech Sme reported.

Read also:Science magazine featured a sculpture from Bratislava on its title page Read more 

Changes in symbiotic relations

The scientists found out, thanks to the maps, how bacteria, mushrooms and trees influence each other, and how climate change would alter the symbiosis that is significantly driven by the emission of greenhouse gases.

If humankind does not limit them in any way, by 2070, the world could lose 10 percent of biomass, especially in colder areas.

At the same time, the loss would cause more carbon dioxide to enter the atmosphere, the authors reported in a press release. Forests are an important natural trap for this greenhouse gas.

"Our models predict fundamental changes in symbiotic relationships in the world's forests - changes that will affect the climate your grandchildren will live in," said study director Brian Steidinger of Stanford University.

©Sme

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Nobelist: Molecular machines can work like smart drugs

In science things often go wrong, sometimes for a long time, but these failures can lead to something beautiful, says 2016 Nobel Prize Laureate Ben Feringa.

Ben Feringa during a lecture at the Comenius University. He visited Slovakia at the invitation of the Slovak Chemical Society at the Slovak Academy of Sciences (SAV) and his stay was supported by Comenius University in Bratislava, the Embassy of the Netherlands to Slovakia and the ESET Foundation within the ESET Science Award project.

UK government launches a campaign before Brexit

The new campaign informs the public about specific actions they need to take to secure their rights and services in their host country.

A Pro EU protestor holds balloons opposite parliament in London, on September 9, 2019. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson voiced optimism on the same day that a new Brexit deal can be reached so Britain leaves the European Union by October 31.

Most-Híd is losing MPs

Party chair Béla Bugár has rejected claims about the decay.

Béla Bugár

Slovak triathlete awarded for saving his competitor's life

Michal Buček helped another triathlete last September during a race in the Yellow Sea.

Michal Buček