Return of public transport to Mlynské Nivy will be delayed

Developer and council agree to wait until the reconstruction is complete.

(Source: SME)

Mlynské Nivy Street will not reopen to public transport in September as originally planned. The developer and Bratislava city council agreed to complete the reconstruction of the street rather than partially open it unfinished, as the closure of Mlynské Nivy Street has not complicated the traffic in Bratislava as expected. The street will reopen to both public transport and general traffic by September 2020 at the latest.

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“Rather than returning public transport to the unfinished boulevard, we preferred to push for conceptual improvements,” said Peter Bubla, spokesperson for Bratislava city council.

Changes to the original project include moving the cycle path to the northern side of the street, where it will be separated from the road. The pavements will be widened from 4.2 metres to 5.5 metres. The number of lanes will decrease from 11 to nine and there will be more trees and one more crossing.

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Mlynské Nivy Street was closed in mid February to all traffic. Public transport buses and trolley buses bypass the closed street via Páričkova Street while other traffic goes via Landererova Street. The original plan was to allow the return of public transport to Mlynské Nivy Street in September while the rest of the traffic would have returned after an additional six months.

The rebuilding of Mlynské Nivy Street into a modern boulevard for €40 million is part of the Nové Nivy project, which includes a brand new bus station.

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Theme: Bratislava


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