An unfinished highway could become an international problem

The highway is crucial for the EU’s transborder Katowice-Ostrava-Žilina industrial zone.

Mayors and businesspeople from the Kysuce Region, northern Slovakia, attend a "lorry" protest in Bratislava on October 22, 2019. The protest takes place in front of the European Commmission in Bratislava buildingMayors and businesspeople from the Kysuce Region, northern Slovakia, attend a "lorry" protest in Bratislava on October 22, 2019. The protest takes place in front of the European Commmission in Bratislava building (Source: TASR)

People in the Kysuce Region are unhappy about the constant dust, noise, and tailbacks on the roads running through their towns and villages caused by thousands of lorries, very often international, every day.

Related articleConstruction of D3 highway near Čadca has started Read more 

Mayors and representatives of big companies in the region, which lies in the northern part of central Slovakia and neighbours Poland and the Czech Republic, met in Bratislava to protest for the faster completion of the D3 highway, as reported by the Hospodárske noviny (HN) daily.

“The latest EU prognosis says the traffic in Kysuce will grow from today’s 30,000 vehicles to 55,000-60,000 a day,” Matej Fabšík of the Žilina Self-Governing Region’s traffic commission told the HN.

Protesters said, on October 22, that they now have come to seek help from Brussels after failed talks with the government and the Transport Ministry.

“We demand that the highway in northern Slovakia be declared an international problem and international highway,” Čadca mayor Milan Gura wrote on Facebook.

International corridor

The Kysuce Region belongs to one of the most progressively growing industrial areas in the European Union, which includes Ostrava (CZ), Katowice (PL), and Žilina (SK).

“We are worried that if we do not finish the road infrastructure, our region may lose its competitiveness,” Fabšík added, as quoted by the HN.

Big companies in the Kysuce Region such as Shaeffler and Kia came to this industrial hub, creating jobs and industrial production, under the promise of tackling the problem regarding transit roads, which has not happened.

“The whole Kysuce Region is now drowning in the traffic problem,” claimed Ľubomír Jánoška, head of the Low Kysuce Business Association, as quoted by the HN.

EC in Bratislava: The D3 is important

20,000 people signed the petition calling for the faster completion of the D3 highway to ease the traffic in a number of Kysuce towns and villages.

Representatives of the European Commission (EC) in Slovakia said the completion of the D3 is immensely important and agreed on sending a delegation to Brussels to draw attention to the importance of the D3, the HN wrote.

“It is part of the trans-European transport network,” Radim Dvořák of the EC in Slovakia said, as quoted by the Pravda daily.

He added that the European Union does not have strong competences to intervene. If nothing changes, protesters are ready to return to Bratislava with actual lorries, not just with cardboard versions like this week.

Related articleSvrčinovec-Skalité D3-motorway stretch opened Read more 

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