SPECTACULAR SLOVAKIA PODCAST

Your guide to learning Slovak

Expat Ali recommends Slovak-language courses in Bratislava.

The opening of the Studia Academica Slovaca (SAS) summer school on August 6, 2018, in the Assembly Hall of Comenius University in BratislavaThe opening of the Studia Academica Slovaca (SAS) summer school on August 6, 2018, in the Assembly Hall of Comenius University in Bratislava(Source: TASR)

Ahoj! - what a wonderful phrase. The Slovak language can sound beautiful to the ear, but many foreigners find it difficult to learn. With complicated grammatical rules and formal and informal verb forms, learning to speak the language on a basic conversational level takes time and patience.

Thankfully, there are many language courses available to foreigners in Bratislava. Some of them are even free. Listen to Ali, a student who is currently studying Slovak at Comenius University, to find out where you can take courses, which Slovak radio programme he loves to listen to for extra language practice, and why it is okay to make mistakes when speaking the complicated language.

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Theme: Bratislava

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