SPECTACULAR SLOVAKIA PODCAST

Grandma explains how to make Slovak doughnuts

Pampúchy or šišky are simple and cheap to make.

Pampúchy or šišky are a common sweet dish in Slovakia.Pampúchy or šišky are a common sweet dish in Slovakia.(Source: TSS)

Pampúch or šiška is a sweet dish that can be regarded as the Slovak counterpart to a typical doughnut.

Coated with powdered sugar, somewhat rounded, and with no filling besides a bit of jam on the top, pampúchy are simply scrumptious.

The recipe does not require expensive ingredients. As an added bonus, about 40 pampúchy can be me made from one dough. In this episode, Peter visits his grandma to learn how to fry pampúchy.

A pampúchy recipe

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Theme: Spectacular Slovakia (travel podcast)

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