Slovak hockey player in Boston receives recognition for his work

He received special tailor-made golden gloves and the mayor of the city gave him a street sign bearing his name.

(Source: AP/TASR)

Slovak defender Zdeno Chára played his 1500th NHL hockey match at the beginning of November 2019. As captain of the Boston Bruins he received an ovation from the crowded Montreal Bell Centre and later fans also applauded him at the TD Garden, the home arena for the Bruins.

Three months later, tribute was paid to the Trenčín-born hockey player by the city of Boston. He received special tailor-made golden gloves and the mayor of the city presented him with a street sign that bears his name.

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“I honestly did not expect this at all. I am overwhelmed. I am lost for words. I am so honoured and so humbled. Again, I don’t think I deserve this. I am just a regular guy, trying to do my best for all the people when I am on the ice or off the ice,” said almost 43-year-old Chára in the video on the official Facebook page of the Bruins.

He started to play in the NHL for the New York Islanders and later for Ottawa Senators. The biggest and most successful part of his career is connected with Boston, where he has lived since 2006.

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