SPECTACULAR SLOVAKIA WEEKLY

Bratislava’s Bronx, Petržalka, developed almost 50 years ago

Read a roundup of travel and culture stories for March 30-April 5.

A construction worker is one of many working on the development of yet-to-be the largest neighbourhood in Slovakia, Petržalka, back in the 1970s. A construction worker is one of many working on the development of yet-to-be the largest neighbourhood in Slovakia, Petržalka, back in the 1970s. (Source: TASR)

PICTURE OF THE WEEK

In March 1973, Bratislava authorities issued a building permit for the construction of Slovakia's largest residential neighbourhood, Petržalka. Although 80 companies from around the world submitted their visuals of how Petržalka should look, none of them were accepted. Construction work on the right bank of the Danube began on April 2. The first apartment complex was opened in early August of 1977 on Romanova Street. Bear in mind that Petržalka was a small town before it became a part of Bratislava in 1946. What does one of its residents, Brit James Thompson, have to say about Petržalka?

TRAVEL

A new field path takes people to the brownfield Muničák

The one-kilometre path leads to the recreation area Pod Horárňou in the Bratislava neighbourhood of Krasňany. On the way there, people can see the former military area Muničák, part of which is opened to the public.

Via ferrata hikes have been closed

The mountain rescue service decided to close the via ferrata hiking route to Martinské Hole until further notice due to the coronavirus. Three ferrata hikes in other regions are closed for the season.

Look at Štrbské Pleso without skiers

It was not a long time ago when the ski resort Štrbské Pleso was crowded with skiers. The situation changed with COVID-19. Tourists are gone, and buffets and accommodation facilities have been closed down.

A king built a castle for his joker

The ruins of Šášov Castle and Castle Revište proudly stand on cliffs and oversee the R1 expressway. The former was a gift to a joker after he allegedly saved his king while hunting. The latter got its name after Lady Dóci's tears of joy.

In conversation with God at a calvary

Banská Štiavnica is home to the iconic calvary, but a neighbouring village of Štiavnické Bane hides another calvary of seven stations. The last station of three crosses is the most beautiful one.

PODCAST

Barrel maker Samko Šikeť lived in the village of Pukanec. One day he decided to leave his home and travel the world. Spectacular Slovakia travels to Pukanec to discover its splendid corners and history. It is now a village, but it used to be a royal town. What else is Pukanec known for? Image: TASR

QUOTEWORTHY

In principle, it is the middle class that goes to the theatre, not the rich.

SLOVAK NATIONAL THEATRE INTERIM GENERAL MANAGER PETER KOVÁČ

Slovak National Theatre tickets had been sold out. Now it is losing €100,000 a week Read more 

WEEKEND READS

How “small prankster” Petra Vlhová became a world-class skier

She was predestined to become a skier, but her father Igor did not believe at first she could become a professional one. However, he kept on supporting her, and when she joined forces with Livio Magoni, she started winning medals.

Love Bank heartens people's coronavirus-restricted lives with warm notes

The unparalleled Love Bank, set in the romantic town of Banská Štiavnica, has decided to give people around the world the possibility to enjoy their loved ones with peerless online notes in social distancing times.

A teenager invented the picoballoon. What is it?

15-year-old researcher Jakub Nagy explains what the picoballoon is used for and does not hold back when asked about funding for R&D in Slovakia. "Slovakia is far behind in aerospace research," he said. Slovakia’s annual budget for aerospace research is just €1.7 million compared to €330 million in the Czech Republic.

An industrial silo block in Bratislava to serve a new purpose

The 50-meter high cement silo block was built in 1963 to store oilseeds and sunflower seeds. It will now become a landmark of the new quarter. The development company Corwin believes that unused industrial buildings do not necessarily need to disappear.

Peter Sagan’s life reminiscent of a rock star

The Slovak cyclist got on a bike when he was nine, winning a race soon after. Sagan has not stopped since then, collecting many trophies. Moreover, his worldwide popularity is indisputable.

The next Spectacular Slovakia Weekly will be published on April 10, 2020.

Read last week's roundup.

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

COVID-19 causes restaurant owners sell their businesses

Hundreds of gastro facilities are being advertised on real estate websites.

A waiter brings a meal to a customer in a Chinese restaurant in Bratislava on May 20, 2020.

Trianon is a trauma for Hungary even a hundred years later

Slovaks and Hungarians look at the events that led up to the Trianon Treaty differently.

Hungarian delegation is leaving the castle Big Trianon after signing the treaty on June 4, 1920.

Some borders start opening ahead of the summer season (news digest)

Matovič and co. visited Czechia. Even foreigners living in Slovakia can travel to Croatia.

PM Matovič, Deputy PM Veronika Remišová and Foreign Affairs Minister Ivan Korčok on board the flight to Prague for the official visit to the Czech Republic on June 3.

Iconic pharmacy Salvator in Bratislava is closer to new life

Bratislava city council wants to resurrect pharmacy after becoming exclusive owner.

The Salvator pharmacy has been closed for more than two decades.