BRINGING WORLD TO THE CLASSROOM

Media exists to seek the truth and explanations

The 2018 Kuciak murder and COVID-19 have changed Slovak media.

Attitudes of those in power towards Slovak media remain unchanged, TSS editor-in-chief Michaela Terenzani says in the Bringing World to the Classroom podcast.Attitudes of those in power towards Slovak media remain unchanged, TSS editor-in-chief Michaela Terenzani says in the Bringing World to the Classroom podcast. (Source: SME)

Politicians in Slovakia do not realise how important it is to preserve people’s trust in the media.

“We need to make sure people trust us and that they can trust us,” The Slovak Spectator editor-in-chief, Michaela Terenzani, also underlines in the podcast.

Media is one of the pillars of the world’s democracy, she adds. Hungary serves as a good example of why people cannot take the media for granted.

Listen to the latest Bringing World to the Classroom episode on Slovak media.

EXAM TOPIC: Mass Media

Other study materials:

‘Infodemic’ hit Slovakia as well Read more 

Glossary: Disinformation during a pandemic may have deadly consequences Read more 

2019 ratings: TV Markíza the most watched, Nový Čas the top daily Read more 

The Spectator College is a programme designed to support the study and teaching of English in Slovakia, as well as to inspire interest in important public issues among young people.

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