BRINGING WORLD TO THE CLASSROOM

Science in Slovakia: Plenty of talents, minimal support

Little things, not only money, can move Slovak science forward.

Scientist Erik Szabó, who works for the Department of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry at the Faculty of Natural Sciences of Comenius University in Bratislava, features the Bringing World to the Classroom podcast.Scientist Erik Szabó, who works for the Department of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry at the Faculty of Natural Sciences of Comenius University in Bratislava, features the Bringing World to the Classroom podcast. (Source: TASR)

Chemistry is not an alien galaxy. People often forget they are chemical factories in ceaseless operation.

Scientist Erik Szabó, who works for the Department of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry at the Faculty of Natural Sciences of Comenius University in Bratislava, explains what should change when it comes to teaching chemistry in schools, illustrating it through a ‘dictionary-grammar’ example.

Moreover, he proves that chemistry can be fun – by turning a bottle blue and colourless afterwards.

“We have plenty of talents,” he also says. Szabó helps future chemists get better. Nonetheless, he expresses dissatisfaction over the underfunded and “closed” nature of science in Slovakia.

EXAM TOPIC: Science & Technology

Other study materials:

Asteroids approach our planet almost daily. Collision is unlikely Read more  Fossil fuels damage forest biodiversity in Europe Read more  Glossary: Science is as wide as the whole universe Read more 

The Spectator College is a programme designed to support the study and teaching of English in Slovakia, as well as to inspire interest in important public issues among young people.

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