Slovak rover Androver I could survey the Moon's terrain

The rover was part of a simulated mission in Hawaii.

Androver IAndrover I (Source: Michaela Musilová)

After a recent successful simulated mission on the Moon, the Slovak rover Androver I could help astronauts examine the surfaces of the Moon and Mars in the future.

The goal of the simulated mission, led by Slovak astrobiologist Michaela Musilová and supported by the European Space Agency (ESA), was to map in detail the volcanic terrain in Hawaii, including lava caves, in which people could build their first settlements on the Moon.

“We used it to survey terrain obstacles that could harm astronauts,” Musilová said.

She added that the movement of astronauts in spacesuits within the terrains full of lava fields, caves, and holes, is demanding. The simulated mission took place on the Mauna Loa volcano in Hawaii, the surface of which is similar to the terrain on the Moon and Mars.

Androver I was the best

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