In the COVID-19 race, the uncertainty is just as stressful as the run

A quantum mechanics principle provides a good summary of 2020 so far.

(Source: TASR)

Imagine you find yourself suddenly running a race. You didn’t ask to do it. You don’t know why you are, or what is waiting at the finish line. Maybe the end is 100 metres away, or maybe it’s 100 kilometres. Should you run fast or slow? You start to get tired. Should you sit down under that shady tree on the side of the road? But what if the finish line — with food, water and a big party — is just around the corner?

Uncertainty like this is at least as stressful as the running itself, and it’s a lot like the feelings that come from living through this COVID-19 crisis.

First came the shock of the outbreak (suddenly you are in a race). So we all started running (shut down, stay home, wear masks). Now, just as we start looking for the finish line, there is a new breakout in Beijing or Germany. Lisbon locks down 19 districts, and it starts to feel like we may have to take another lap around the racecourse.

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