Tip for trip: New lookout tower at Devínska Kobyla

Its location offers views of Austria, the Czech Republic and Hungary.

(Source: TASR)
Lost in Bratislava? Impossible with this City Guide! Lost in Bratislava? Impossible with this City Guide! (Source: Spectacular Slovakia)

In Devínska Kobyla, a popular tourist locality in Bratislava which is possible to explore with our Bratislava travel guide, a new lookout tower opened in the compound of a former missile site.

It is 21-metres high, so it is comparable with a seven-floor building. Visitors need to conquer 112 steps to reach the top.

Its location offers views of Austria, the Czech Republic and Hungary. It has the shape of a mantis.

“The lookout tower has the potential to become another significant touristic attraction of Slovakia and Bratislava,” said Dárius Krajčír, mayor of Bratislava borough Devínska Nová Ves, who is behind the idea of the tower, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

Devín and Schloss Hof

The view of three neighbouring countries was a reason for placing the lookout platforms at various elevation levels, he added.

Visitors can see the Alps or Vienna, and on days with good weather, Zobor near Nitra. People can observe Devínska Nová Ves, Devín Castle or the Austrian castle Schloss Hof.

Access to the lookout tower is free; however, in the winter, the tower is closed to visitors.

Alien black pines give way to original nature at Bratislava’s Devínska Kobyla Read more 

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