Plans to revamp Bratislava's main rail station resurface

The national rail infrastructure operator, ŽSR, has committed itself to offering a swift solution.

Franz Liszt Square, familiarly known as the station square, in front of the Bratislava main railway station. Franz Liszt Square, familiarly known as the station square, in front of the Bratislava main railway station. (Source: Sme/Jozef Jakubčo)

Compared to other main railway stations in the surrounding countries, the station in Bratislava – still in a deplorable state – remains a disgrace according to many.

Despite cosmetic improvements to Bratislava’s main railway station having been carried out in the past, its complete makeover – plans for which have been floating about for two decades - has not happened to date.

The management of the national rail infrastructure operator, Železnice Slovenskej republiky (ŽSR) is now talking about a restart, aimed at the elimination of the bad image of the capital city’s main station in the eyes of passengers.

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