Bratislava Region toughens up its COVID-19 measures. Here’s what you should prepare for

The measures come into force on September 14.

Illustrative stock photoIllustrative stock photo (Source: AP/TASR)

Bratislava Region has reported the highest number of people who have tested positive for the novel coronavirus.

All of Bratislava is in the red zone, meaning the epidemic situation here has worsened. The regional Public Health Authority office (RÚVZ) has issued a directive for the capital and the whole region that toughens up measures concerning mass events, including ceremonies in churches. It also bans visits to hospitals and nursing homes, starting on September 14.

Related articleCzechia may be added to the red list and more new rules are put in place Read more 

As a result, Bratislava Region will introduce tougher measures sooner than the rest of Slovakia, which will follow dates presented by the pandemic commission on September 11.

The Sme daily has provided answers to FAQs about the measures in the capital and the districts of Senec, Pezinok and Malacky.

Q: Why are the same measures applied in red and orange districts?
Q: What measures are applied to bars and restaurants?
Q: What rules apply to events in interiors?
Q: What rules apply to events in exteriors?
Q: Can more than 50 people be in a restaurant during ordinary operation?
Q: Is it possible to organise a bigger event?
Q: Are there any sanctions for breaching the rules?
Q: Can I go to church?
Q: Can I ask for compensation for cancelled measures?
Q: Will shopping in grocery stores be restricted?
Q: Are work, school, and travelling on public transport considered mass events and are limits applied?
Q: What rules apply to nursing homes?
Q:
For how long will the measures be in place?

Q: Why are the same measures applied in red and orange districts?

A: The entire city of Bratislava is labelled as risky, i.e. red district. Senec, Pezinok and Malacky are labelled as orange, where the epidemic situation is less serious.

Many people are travelling from these regions to the capital, though, either to work or school. As they are closely linked, the measures are the same, explained Katarína Nosálová, spokesperson of Bratislava RÚVZ.

Q: Which measures apply to bars and restaurants?

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