Most Slovaks plan to participate in the nationwide testing

But people are also afraid of becoming infected and organisational chaos.

(Source: SITA)

More than 44 percent of people plan to participate in the blanket testing for coronavirus in Slovakia. This stems from a poll carried out by the AKO agency published by the Hospodárske Noviny daily.

The pollster addressed 1,000 respondents between October 19 and 20, 2020.

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Another 28.3 percent said they would probably participate, while 9.9 percent would definitely not attend. About 10.4 percent of respondents would probably not participate and 7 percent did not know.

People who did not say they would definitely attend were asked about their concerns about the testing. About 37.7 percent are afraid to become infected at the sampling site, while 34.3 percent are afraid of organisational chaos and 14.1 percent fear economic collapse if everyone stays in quarantine.

Another 12.3 percent opine that infected people will not remain in isolation. About 5 percent do not want to know if they are infected.

Some respondents also considered the tests inaccurate, while others consider the sample-taking process to be unpleasant.

Only 2.2 percent reject the tests and do not agree with them.

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