Slovak tennis players banned for match fixing

Dagmara Bašková was hit with a 12-year ban for repeated corruption offences.

Rod Laver Arena in Melbourne, Australia.Rod Laver Arena in Melbourne, Australia. (Source: TASR)

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In recent months, two Slovak tennis players have been banned from the sport for several years after being found guilty of match fixing by the International Tennis Integrity Agency (ITIA), which combats corruption in the sport.

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Barbora Palcatová, a player with a career-high ITF singles ranking of 1,685, was charged for arranging the outcome of a tennis match in 2017. As a result, she cannot play in or attend any tennis tournament for three years and must pay a fine of $5,000.

Provided Palcatová does not resort to another corruption-related offense during this period, she could return to the tennis court in two years and the fine could also be reduced, as ruled by Anti-Corruption Hearing Officer Ian Mill QC in April.

Banned for 12 years

Tennis player Dagmara Bašková, who had the highest WTA singles ranking of 1,117, was severely penalised last December. She was involved in five cases of match fixing in 2017, according to the ITIA, which is why her ban was to last 12 years. However, she has since retired from tennis.

In 2015, player Ivo Klec was suspended for two years and fined $10,000 for breaching the Tennis Anti-Corruption Programme. He then failed to cooperate with an investigation conducted by the agency.

The Spectator College is a programme designed to support the study and teaching of English in Slovakia, as well as to inspire interest in important public issues among young people.

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