NGOs complain about changes to public procurement. They will turn to respective bodies

The introduction of the electronic platform breaches the principles of economic competition, they say.

The latest changes to public procurement limit the powers of the Public Procurement Office in connection with construction agreements.The latest changes to public procurement limit the powers of the Public Procurement Office in connection with construction agreements. (Source: TASR)

The recently adopted amendment to the law on public procurement breaches the principles of economic competition and makes business with the state less transparent.

This is how two non-governmental organisations, Slovensko.Digital and Let’s Stop the Corruption Foundation, have commented on several changes recently approved as part of an amendment to the law on public procurement. They even said that they would turn to the Antimonopoly Office and the European Commission.

In their opinion, the introduction of the so-called electronic platform breaches the principles of economic cooperation. The new rules offer less transparency to business with the state and weaken control. There are some changes they regard as positive.

What they refer to

The platform is a new electronic tool for the state’s purchase. The public contracting authorities will be obliged to use the platform for all buy limit orders and low value purchase orders. Until now, they could have used either state or private tools.

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