General Prosecutor’s Office cancels agreement with Russia signed two months ago

The office says it does not need politicians to tell it how to react to the current situation in Ukraine.

Maroš ŽilinkaMaroš Žilinka (Source: SITA)

General Prosecutor Maroš Žilinka signed an agreement with his Russian counterpart in early January 2022. He travelled to Moscow to participate in celebrations related to the anniversary of the Russian prosecution service.

Now, after the repeated calls of politicians to cancel the agreement, the General Prosecutor’s Office announced that it has already done so.

SkryťRemove ad
Article continues after video advertisement
SkryťRemove ad
Article continues after video advertisement

GP does not need calls from politicians

Spokesperson for the General Prosecutor’s Office Jana Tökölyová told the media that the office does not need politicians to call on it to tell it how to react to the attack on Ukraine by armed forces of the Russian Federation.

The rest of this article is premium content at Spectator.sk
Subscribe now for full access

I already have subscription - Sign in

Subscription provides you with:
  • Immediate access to all locked articles (premium content) on Spectator.sk
  • Special weekly news summary + an audio recording with a weekly news summary to listen to at your convenience (received on a weekly basis directly to your e-mail)
  • PDF version of the latest issue of our newspaper, The Slovak Spectator, emailed directly to you
  • Access to all premium content on Sme.sk and Korzar.sk

Top stories

Far-right LSNS MPs leave the room during Ukrainian President Zelensky's speech.

What kind of person walks out on Zelensky?

The kind that is trying to get into government, unfortunately.


4 h
The Spectrum Hotel in Trnava.

Hotels help refugees with no state aid in sight

Belated aid hurts hotels largely dependent on the summer tourist season.


8 h
LGBT+ organisations in Slovakia welcome the new gender reassignment protocol, but conservative groups are demanding that it be scrapped.

New rules on gender recognition mean a lot to transgender people – and to conservatives

The new gender reassignment protocol replaces a 1981 regulation. It’s a step forward, say activists; conservatives are outraged.


12. may
Bratislava

Why come to Slovakia?

And why I would surely return.


13. may
SkryťClose ad