Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

NEWS IN SHORT

Lawyer Partner's motions flood Constitutional Court

THOUSANDS of motions have flooded the Constitutional Court. From February 6 to February 11, the company Lawyer Partners filed 14,595 nearly identical complaints with the court, the SITA newswire wrote.

THOUSANDS of motions have flooded the Constitutional Court. From February 6 to February 11, the company Lawyer Partners filed 14,595 nearly identical complaints with the court, the SITA newswire wrote.

The firm, involved in claiming overdue listener fees from listeners of the public Slovak Radio, complains that several district courts have not accepted its electronically filed complaints. It demands that its complaints be processed without unnecessary delay.

Constitutional Court President Ivetta Macejková said at a press conference on February 19 that the registration of such a big number of complaints will take about three months. The court has already hired two administrative workers to do the job.

"We do our best to process the complaints within nine months of their registration," said Macejková.

But the whole process will be administratively demanding and expensive. For example, sending final verdicts in only written form will cost the court Sk1 million at least, the Sme daily wrote.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Youngest Slovak village is a "communist dream come true” Photo

Dedina Mládeže (The Youth Village) was a mere experiment during the communist era. Now, the still inhabited village has morphed into an open-air museum.

Dedina Mládeže

Revitalised industrial building offers work, entertainment and housing

Mlynica is an excellent example of successful conversion of unused industrial building.

Mlynica

What are the reasons behind low wages in Slovakia?

The average wage costs per Slovak employee accounts for only 44 percent of the EU average.

How to keep politics and sports separate

FIFA, may not be a government, but they and the events they put on are undeniably political and embody all the worst things about globalisation.

Saudi Arabia Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, FIFA President Gianni Infantino and Russian President Vladimir Putin (left to right) stand for the anthem prior to the match between Russia and Saudi Arabia which opened the 2018 soccer World Cup in Russia.