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Aeroflot resumes Moscow-Bratislava flights

The Russian airline Aeroflot restarted its scheduled air-link between Bratislava and Moscow on May 27, after a four-year hiatus. It will now fly twice a week, on Tuesdays and Thursdays, using TU-154M aircraft. “A scheduled line will stimulate the development of tourism and business interests,” Aeroflot’s director-general, Valery M. Okulov, told reporters. If there is sufficient interest, Aeroflot is set to increase the number of flights. In the 1990s and early 2000s, Aeroflot flew five times a week between Moscow and Bratislava. The service ended in 2004 when the IL-62 and TU-134 aircraft used on the route failed to meet European noise and emission standards after Slovakia joined the European Union. Between 2004 and 2007, the air-link between the capitals was provided by Slovak Airlines. In February, Aeroflot – which began operating in Bratislava in 1969 –celebrated its 85th anniversary in business. Its fleet includes 85 planes, half of which are Airbus A320s and Boeing 767s. TASR

The Russian airline Aeroflot restarted its scheduled air-link between Bratislava and Moscow on May 27, after a four-year hiatus. It will now fly twice a week, on Tuesdays and Thursdays, using TU-154M aircraft. “A scheduled line will stimulate the development of tourism and business interests,” Aeroflot’s director-general, Valery M. Okulov, told reporters.

If there is sufficient interest, Aeroflot is set to increase the number of flights. In the 1990s and early 2000s, Aeroflot flew five times a week between Moscow and Bratislava. The service ended in 2004 when the IL-62 and TU-134 aircraft used on the route failed to meet European noise and emission standards after Slovakia joined the European Union. Between 2004 and 2007, the air-link between the capitals was provided by Slovak Airlines. In February, Aeroflot – which began operating in Bratislava in 1969 –celebrated its 85th anniversary in business. Its fleet includes 85 planes, half of which are Airbus A320s and Boeing 767s. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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