Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

HISTORY TALKS...

Main Square (Bratislava)

THIS IMAGE of Bratislava's Hlavné Námestie or Main Square dates back to approximately 1906. The square originated in the 13th century and from the beginning was at the centre of the town's social life.

Click to enlarge.

THIS IMAGE of Bratislava's Hlavné Námestie or Main Square dates back to approximately 1906. The square originated in the 13th century and from the beginning was at the centre of the town's social life.

It was a place of markets and festivities as well as executions, which were very well attended events.

In the background, the neo-Baroque palace of the Palugyay family dating from 1882 dominates the postcard. This palace replaced a huge and gloomy house called Burg, which Bratislava citizens considered to be the oldest in the town.

A 15th century house belonging to the Auers family adjoins the Palugyay Palace on the left. This house no longer exists on the square, as in 1906 a palace in the Art Nouveau style was erected in its place.

In the Middle Ages the Main Square was without greenery. It was not until 1884 that the Bratislava okrášľovací spolok (Bratislava Beautification Society) turned the square into a green park. During the communist regime the greenery was poorly maintained, and the square lost some of its former cachet.

Nowadays the square is again without greenery, and thus has been returned to its original appearance from the Middle Ages.


Prepared by Branislav Chovan

Top stories

Lack of experts challenges ICT sector

To maintain the competitiveness, the Slovak government must support digitising the economy and take a positive stance towards the ICT sector, according to experts.

Illustrative stock photo

Germans will distribute cars from Nitra’s JRL plant

The state-run freight carrier Cargo did not succeed in its bid, but is still discussing the distribution of suborders with the German firm.

Jaguar Land Rover’s construction site

Ministry: Law against puppy farms affects honest breeders

The recently passed law, clamping down on puppy farms will have serious consequences for honest dog breeders and state employees.

Illustrative stock photo.

Mihál leaving SaS

Behind his decision is disagreement with the stances of party chair Richard Sulík.

Jozef Mihál (l) and Richard Sulík (r)