HISTORY TALKS...

Main Square (Bratislava)

THIS IMAGE of Bratislava's Hlavné Námestie or Main Square dates back to approximately 1906. The square originated in the 13th century and from the beginning was at the centre of the town's social life.

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THIS IMAGE of Bratislava's Hlavné Námestie or Main Square dates back to approximately 1906. The square originated in the 13th century and from the beginning was at the centre of the town's social life.

It was a place of markets and festivities as well as executions, which were very well attended events.

In the background, the neo-Baroque palace of the Palugyay family dating from 1882 dominates the postcard. This palace replaced a huge and gloomy house called Burg, which Bratislava citizens considered to be the oldest in the town.

A 15th century house belonging to the Auers family adjoins the Palugyay Palace on the left. This house no longer exists on the square, as in 1906 a palace in the Art Nouveau style was erected in its place.

In the Middle Ages the Main Square was without greenery. It was not until 1884 that the Bratislava okrášľovací spolok (Bratislava Beautification Society) turned the square into a green park. During the communist regime the greenery was poorly maintained, and the square lost some of its former cachet.

Nowadays the square is again without greenery, and thus has been returned to its original appearance from the Middle Ages.


Prepared by Branislav Chovan

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