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The big Choč

PAINTER Jozef Kuska created a painting in 1920 that depicts an almost ideal landscape. The view from the Liptov town of Ružomberok towards Likava Castle and, in the background, the impressive Choč hill enchanted many viewers.

PAINTER Jozef Kuska created a painting in 1920 that depicts an almost ideal landscape. The view from the Liptov town of Ružomberok towards Likava Castle and, in the background, the impressive Choč hill enchanted many viewers.

People enjoyed this breathtaking panorama long before the castle appeared. Historically, a trading route led through this area, connecting the Danube region with the Baltic region. Merchants either sailed on the nearby Váh River (which cannot be seen in the postcard), or went overland.

The intensity of life in this place has been confirmed by many local archaeological excavations and it is no coincidence that the medieval Likava Castle – the most massive of the castles guarding Liptov – was built here. Choč served as a good orientation point for ancient travellers. Today it is a popular destination for tourists, something which may also be due to the fact that the route leading to this beautiful hill is not very demanding, and the view from Choč is regarded by many to be the most beautiful in Slovakia. Deservedly, this hill is also called “Viewing Mound No 1”.


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