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Poll: Smer would win 41.5 percent of votes and 78 mandates

If parliamentary election took place on the last weekend in March (when the presidential election took place), it would be won by the Smer party, with so 41.5 percent of vote and would get 78 chairs in parliament. It would be followed by the Christian-Democratic Movement (KDH) with the support of 9.2 percent and 17 mandates, and Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO) would get 9 percent of votes.

If parliamentary election took place on the last weekend in March (when the presidential election took place), it would be won by the Smer party, with so 41.5 percent of vote and would get 78 chairs in parliament. It would be followed by the Christian-Democratic Movement (KDH) with the support of 9.2 percent and 17 mandates, and Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO) would get 9 percent of votes.

The results come from a poll by the Polis agency ordered by the SITA newswire which was conducted between March 22 and 28. The fourth party to make it into parliament would be Most-Híd on 7.7 percent and 15 mandates, followed by the Party of Hugarian Community (SMK) on 6.5 percent and 12 mandates. The Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) would garner 5.8 percent and 11 chairs. Other parties (Freedom and Solidarity-SaS, 4.8 percent; NOVA and Slovak National party-SNS, with 3.7 percent each) would not make it into parliament.

Polis Slovakia mad called 1,521 respondents over age 18. The preferences are calculated from a 55-percent turnout, with 28 percent of those asked not knowing whether they would go to the ballot-boxes and 17 percent saying they would not vote.

Another poll ordered by SITA was conducted by the eCall Slovakia company. It found that only three parties would pass the five-percent threshold necessary for gaining chairs in parliament: Smer with 27.7 percent of votes, future party of Radoslav Procházka on 15.4 percent of votes and Christian-Democratic Movement-KDH with 5.1 percent. Data collected on March 31 and April 1 on 1,503 respondents see other parties as failing to make it into parliament, with 77 percent of respondents calling for a generation replacement in politics.

(Source: SITA)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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