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Starbucks opens in Slovakia

The first café opens in Bratislava, but other big cities may follow.

(Source: SME)

The US coffee company Starbucks has opened its first premise in Slovakia, situated in Bratislava-based shopping centre Aupark. It is possible that the number of cafés in Slovakia may increase, the Hospodárske Noviny daily reported.

In the past, Starbucks avoided Slovakia, though it has been established in neighbouring countries. The reason was the insufficient purchasing power and market size. The consumer behaviour of Slovaks has, however, improved so the company finally decided to open a café in the country, the Sme daily wrote.

Though Slovakia will not be a crucial market for Starbucks, analysts agree that the company’s arrival may turn coffee into a bigger fashion trend than it is now, as reported by Hospodárske Noviny.

“It is very good marketing which has managed to turn ordinary coffee into a premium staple,” Michal Kozub, analyst with HomeCredit, told Sme.

He explained that the café insists on perfect service and kind attendants.

Moreover, the company invests big money into marketing or tries to offer a quality assortment of coffee. It also offers some snacks and cakes, Sme reported.

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Topic: Bratislava


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