Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

We visited Jehovah's Witnesses to talk

Russia is oppressing Jehovah's Witnesses after courts described them as extremists.

(Source: Sme)

Around 100 believers in Bratislava suburb Petržalka listen to advice on how to talk to people on the street.

“Do not forget the fresh breath,” says the speaker from the podium. “But even the full mouth of the candies won’t help to those who have problem with the sphincer.”

Some people responded with embarrassed whispering but most of them were laughing. An elderly couple on the edge of the room pulls out menthol candies and puts them in their mouths.

Jehovah's Witnesses practice personal contact with people every week. The Slovak Spectator visited one of such meetings. The assembly is not led by one person. It’s program is divided into several blocks that are led by different elders of the church. They recall that through the behavior of individuals the public perceives the entire religious society.

Elders have repeatedly pointed on Russia, where the Supreme Court in June confirmed a ban on Jehovah's Witnesses on the grounds that they are extremists who threaten society. At the end of June, also Kazakhstan suspended their activities for three months.

Some people in the assembly were worried that the bans will spread further among 240 countries with more than 8,34 million official members of Jehovah's Witnesses around the world. There are almost 11 500 of them in Slovakia.

Although they are described as extremists in Russia, it does not mean that people should be afraid of Jehovah's Witnesses. The ban mirrors rather decreasing religious freedom in Russia than the practices of the Jehovah's Witnesses, according to František Fojtík, a Czech court expert in the field of cults and new religious movements.

Witnesses are willing to respond on The Slovak Spectator’s question but they do not want to speak on record. They suggest to ask their headquarters in Bratislava.

Slovak spokesperson of Jehovah's Witnesses Rastislav Eliaš described the Russian decision as absurd. Jehovah's Witnesses, in his view, are known for imitating Jesus Christ, which means that they do not have political ambitions, do not engage in wars and refuse violence.

"We don’t threaten society, on the contrary, our evangelistic activity is changing people for the better,” Eliaš told The Slovak Spectator. “Witnesses in Russia are in same position as al-Qaeda while they are peaceful religious society that refuses to fight.”

Dangerous or not?

Witnesses are labeled as dangerous cult but the organization rejects such claims. It usually points to the fact that it does not have one leader who is fanatically followed by believers.

The rest of this article is premium content at Spectator.sk
Subscribe now for full access

Annual
subscription

29 €
Buy
You save 17.80 € compared with monthly subsription
Quarterly
subscription
9.90 €
Buy
You save 1.80 € compared with monthly subsription
Monthly
subscription
0.98 €
Buy
Price is only for new subscribers for their first month. All other months are standard price of 3.90€

I already have subscription - Sign in

Subscription provides you with:
  • Immediate access to all locked articles (premium content) on Spectator.sk
  • Special weekly news summary + an audio recording with a weekly news summary to listen to at your convenience (received on a weekly basis directly to your e-mail)
  • PDF version of the latest issue of our newspaper, The Slovak Spectator, emailed directly to you
  • Access to all premium content on Sme.sk and Korzar.sk

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Jaguar will need people from abroad for its Slovakia's plant

HR director Nicci Cook says that she sees women and the long-term unemployed as an untapped resource of the work force for the JLR plant in Nitra.

Nicci Cook

People marched for LGBTI rights in Bratislava

Take a look at the Bratislava Rainbow Pride 2018 that took place on Saturday, July 14.

Begin afresh

I’m not sure if there is a typical Canadian way to get married.

Slovakia to buy F-16 fighter jets. What is wrong with the ministry's analysis?

The Defence Ministry persuaded the government that the American offer is better than the Swedish, but analysts are not convinced.

F-16 fighter jet.