Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Interior minister will not be prosecuted for corruption

The prosecutor’s office did not find his business with a tax fraud suspect suspicious.

Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák(Source: SME)

The police will not investigate the business of Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák and former transport minister Ján Počiatek with tax fraud suspect Ladislav Bašternák as corruption.

There is no proof to launch an investigation, Deputy Prosecutor General Peter Šufliarsky told the Denník N daily after reading the investigation file.

“We must not look at the matter from the political and journalistic point of view but from the expert one,” Šufliarsky told the daily, adding that it is not the task of the General Prosecutor’s Office to provide the moral evaluation of its business.

Dubious transaction

The case concerns the transfer of shares of the B. A. Haus company, which was established in 2008. It was founded by Počiatek, Bašternák and Marek Turčan, a lawyer known for doing business with Kaliňák. Over three years, Bašternák put a total of €850,000 registered as loans into the company. Počiatek also lent €315,000 to the firm.

Bašternák decided to sell his 34-percent stock in the company in October 2013. He sold 17 percent to Kaliňák and another 17 percent to Počiatek. They paid €8,000.

Read also:Thousands of people rallied against corruption

However, the real estate broker estimated the value of the shares at between €600,000 and €1 million. Since Počiatek already owned some shares, he became the majority shareholder in B. A. Haus. The rest of the shares are now owned by Kaliňák and Turčan, Denník N wrote.

Bašternák also sold his loan in the company to Kaliňák and Počiatek, dividing it in half. Kaliňák even borrowed from Tatra Banka to purchase the loan. This transaction was later noticed by Filip Rybanič, MP assistant of Jozef Rajtár from Freedom and Solidarity (SaS), who is currently facing prosecution for divulging bank secrets.

Read also:MP assistant who peeked into Kaliňák’s account will face court

No actions from the prosecutor’s office

Although the transaction resembles a business more than a gift, the prosecutor's office will not begin an investigation. There is no proof that Kaliňák or Počiatek agreed to do something for the businessman in return, according to Denník N.

The General Prosecutor’s Office closed the case without ordering an expert opinion to assess the value of the stock purchased by Kaliňák. The interior minister claims that he paid the real price, which is improbable considering the value of the real estate.

Read also:Corruption is also a problem of our mentality

Šufliarsky says that the expert opinion would be more than required by the respective law, Denník N wrote.

Bašternák, meanwhile, faces accusations of tax fraud after receiving excessive VAT refunds from the state for the purchase of flats, for which he allegedly paid €12 million in cash.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Topic: Corruption & scandals


Top stories

Slovaks who fled the 1968 occupation tell their stories

How would it feel to pack my suitcases tonight and leave all this tomorrow morning, never to return?

Last days in Austria before departure from the US. Valika Tóthová and her family (parents Pavol and Hedviga Solar, sisters Alica and Darinka, and son Petrík)
Autorkou fotky je .

Prominent architect felt he needed to prove himself abroad

Slovakia today grapples with the same problems as Germany and Austria, opines Peter Gero.

Peter Gero and wife in Germany.

Tanks have stripped the regime naked

Communist leaders cared little about the ideology. They only wanted power.

Tanks in Bratislava

Tanks rumbled through the streets, crushing everything in their way

Tim Wade visited Czechoslovakia in 1968 as a 12-year-old boy. Here are his memories from the invasion in Prague.

My family with our Czech friends in Jihlava.